Catching Cod

Fishing for bottom dwellers hasn’t changed much through the centuries, in that dropping a line into deep waters with a hook, bait and a weight can land you a fish tale to tell. We have used clams, mackerel, worms, jigs and lures. We have even landed keeper size codfish in our lobster pots. 

Wreck fishing has always proved to be the place to land a memorable fish. We would fish off a wreck 11 miles north of the tip of Provincetown in Stellwagen Bank. It was 155 feet of water and guaranteed several 20-35 lb. cod, pollock and haddock. Also lurking in these deep waters are halibut, cusk and wolffish. Depending on the time of year, bottom dwellers can be fished by boat or by land. By boat has always proved to be bigger catches for us.

How to Catch Cod

"Many men go fishing all of their

lives without knowing that it is not fish

they are after." 

—Henry David Thoreau, Cape Cod

Funny Fishing Photos

Young Santiago poses next to his prize winning first and second place codfish

There are state and federal cod fishing regulations for private and recreational fishing. So please catch, “take a selfie”, and release should you hook a codfish inadvertently when unsure what the regulations are for northern and southern Cape Cod waters.

What To Use (tackle):
Atlantic cod are bottom dwelling fish that prefer substrates, ranging from rock to fine gravel. A 5 to 8 foot medium to heavy action rod, equipped with a heavy reel, and spooled with 50lb. test dacron line, is considered standard gear. Successful commercial cod charters use a jig (10 ounces and up) coupled with a teaser (plastic worm), which are fished off the bottom with a jerking motion. 
Baits:
Cod and bottom dwellers feed on many kinds of animals that live near the sea floor. Their favorite foods are crabs, sea worms, clams, and fishes. Worm baits need to be a full 12” long, and even these will be taken by small codling around a couple of pounds. Whole squid, even three whole calamari on rigs, is good bait for shallow boat fishing and deep water wrecking. We prefer a 10-ounce Swedish jig with clams or mussels. Mussel is good bait fished over rocks, but you need big baits of several mussels bound up together on the hook. 
Oh My Cod Aparrel
Catching Cod Video
These Guys are AWESOME!
CATCH & COOK
Catching Atlantic Cod Kayaking!
They catch, fillet, cook and give their personal review on flavor while cleansing the palate with the perfect beer. {Fish & Sips}
PERFECT
BEER

Source: maineguides.com